Bev Waring
Waring Bowman Realty
 
Suite 211
Castle Inn
20 Delaware Avenue
PO Box 72
Delaware Water Gap, PA 18327
570-421-8484
 
Contact Bev
570-213-4084 direct
888-898-6886 toll free
If you are looking for a Pocono Realtor, have questions, or need additional information, give me a call today. And, remember, I can show you any of the homes in the Pocono area!
Add us to Facebook:

Hamilton Township Real Estate


Hamilton Township is located close to Interstate 80 in Monroe County, PA. Zip Codes include 18353, 18354 and 18360. Hamilton Township consists of the villages of Snydersville, Sciota, part of Bartonsville and Saylorsburg, and includes these communities:
 
 

Whether you’re buying or selling Pocono real estate, reviewing the listings shown below will provide you with valuable information about the Hamilton Township real estate market.
Hamilton Township Clickable Community Quick MLS Search
Beaver Valley Acres Berties Green Acres Birnam Woods Brislin Estates Buck Ridge Chadford Commons Country Pines Deerfield Estates East View Estates Glenbrook Hamilton Hills Hamilton Terrace High Terrace Hills At Hamilton Square Hiwood Acres Indian Springs Kettle Creek Estates Kettle Ridge Meadow Lake Park The Meadows Quail Ridge Rimrock Woods Running Valley Farm Saylors Lake Timber Ridge White Oak Country Estates Woodhills Estates The Woods Back to Featured Listings Our Office Listings No Annual HOA Fee All Homes in the Township

About Hamilton Township

Overview

Hamilton Township is another Monroe County township located in the eastern portion of Pennsylvania. It, along with other nearby townships, comprise a region that resides nearby the Pocono Mountains. Here, much of Monroe County's active tourism and vacationing industries remain active.

In comparison to surrounding townships. Hamilton Township is relatively modest in size and in population. The township takes up at least 38 square miles, which consists of mostly land and some bodies of water.

Hamilton Township hosts several unincorporated communities, including Blue Mountain Pines, Bossardsville, Hamilton Square, Sandhill, Sciota, Snydersville and Stormville. A small part of Saylorsburg also resides in the area.

Hamilton Township hosts vast expanses of farm fields, most of which were surrounded by limestone ridges that provided soil fertile enough to support farming. In fact, these rich fields helped support the early agricultural industry that still leaves its presence on the area today.

As of the 2010 census, this township hosts a healthy population of around 8,200 residents.

Hamilton Township Today

Today, this second class township still remains within the heart of the Pocono Mountains. Its rich historic heritage and location makes it an ideal place for people who want to live in a more rural, yet fairly burgeoning Pocono real estate area.

Since its relatively close to a metropolitan area, people who buy Pocono homes here won't have any difficulties settling in.

History

Hamilton Township was first established in late December 1762, a date that makes it the second-oldest township located in Monroe County. The township was, in fact, originally formed by the Northampton County court. The origins of the township's name is said to trace back to James Hamilton, who at the time, served as the lieutenant governor of Pennsylvania.

As with other townships, the exchanging of acres of land was common back then. The earliest known deed in the township took place in the mid 1700s, when the Penn family and Bucks County's Nicholas Weiser negotiated a sale of 244 acres of the land. This land was later inherited and sold to John McDowell in 1764.

The township's earliest road is known as the Sullivan Road, which was established as a part of the route that General John Sullivan took northward in his famous 1778 march to the Wyoming Valley.

As mentioned, Hamilton Township's early days were defined by its rich agricultural industry. Most settlers there took up some form of agriculture or farming, producing crops like grains, corn, potatoes, hay and even fruits including pears, apples and plums. Peaches, too, were grown in choice regions of the township where they could achieve their 'peak perfection.'